News

Nives Dolsak and Aseem Prakash on Trump and the Environment

Nives Dolsak, a professor in the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, and Aseem Prakash, founding director of the Center for Environmental Politics, wrote an article for Slate Magazine talking about President-elect Trump and his attitude towards environmental regulations and the current state of climate change saying, "He can do plenty of damage. Here's how environmentalists must collaborate with and stand up to the president-elect".

Read more at Slate Magazine

On being a climate scientist

By LuAnne Thompson Director, University of Washington Program on Climate Change Walters Professor of Oceanography, Adjunct Professor Physics and Atmospheric Sciences This past week has been a whirlwind and I feel like I am finally catching my breath and wanted to share my reflections on what role the Program on Climate Change should play both on and off campus over the next year.  

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GCC's 10th Anniversary - 93 graduate students from near and far talking and tweeting climate

GCC 2016 Summary -Greg Quetin, Atmospheric Sciences,  PCC Graduate Student Representative The 10th Annual Graduate Climate Conference (GCC) was hosted between October 28th and 30th at the University of Washington Pack Forest Facility. 93 graduate students from both USA and international institutions gathered to discuss climate science, with sessions including talks and posters on “Atmospheric Dynamics, Clouds and Chemistry”, “Ocean Dynamics and Interactions”, “Biosphere Interactions”, “Biogeochemistry”, “Water, Ice, and Snow”, “Paleoclimate” and “Human Dimensions”. 

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Carbon storage in WA state forests is too small and too risky to play a serious role fighting climate change

Richard Gammon, Emeritus Professor, UW Department of Chemistry, UW School of Oceanography Steven Emerson, Professor, UW School of Oceanography The scientific community is almost universally in agreement that climate change (and ocean acidification) are severe threats that demand a rapid response, with putting a price on fossil fuel CO2 emissions being a top priority.  Far and away the single biggest contributor to climate change is CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion.  

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Gregory Johnson on Argo and the Study of the Ocean in Scientific American

A fleet of robots, trolling the oceans and measuring their heat content, has revolutionized scientists’ ability to study how climate change is affecting the seas. Now the aquatic machines called Argo floats are going into the deepest ocean abyss. “We know a lot from Argo now that we have over a decade’s worth of temperature data” said Gregory Johnson.

Read more at Scientific American