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54 posts in General

PCC Updates: May 1, 2020

We are in the place in between.  These last few months have been challenging for instruction, for fieldwork, for just being able to focus with little in-person human interaction.  One challenge now is defining a pathway forward, ways to adapt PCC programming that fosters community in the uncertainty that defines the times.  At the PCC board meeting on April 20, Rebecca Woodgate voiced what many on the board were thinking– that moving our major annual event, the PCC Summer Institute, scheduled for September, online, is the right thing to do.  

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The Program on Climate Change Winter Welcome 2020. In the Time Before.

On 25 February 2020, 80 climate scientists, educators and staff from across campus gathered in person to celebrate much that was new in the community for 2019/2020.  What we did not realize at the time was that this was going to be one of the last face-to-face interactions we could have as a community for months. Two weeks later, on March 9 the University of Washington went to remote operations, finishing the winter quarter online.  

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PCC Updates: December 2019

Welcome to new Program on Climate Change Director Becky Alexander and PCC Board Members. In case you missed it, the PCC has a new director, Becky Alexander (Atmospheric Sciences). Read more in her welcome letter.  Thank you to Cecilia Bitz for her leadership as PCC Director from 2017 to 2019. Welcome Nives Dolsak (SMEA), Aaron Donohoe (APL), Alex Gagnon (OCN), Soo-Hyung Kim (SEFS), and Greta Shum (ATMOS) to the 2019-2020 PCC Governing Board. 

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Updates from the PCC Graduate Student Steering Committee (P-GraSC)

The PCC Graduate Student Steering Committee (P-GraSC) is about to have it’s third meeting of the 2018-19 academic year. In the fall, we welcomed new members and said goodbye to those who finished their terms. PCC Assistant Director Miriam Bertram attended the first meeting and PCC Director Cecilia Bitz attended our second meeting to lead discussions of current PCC initiatives. This year, P-GraSC is coordinating a wide range of outreach and education efforts, which include augmenting the Slide Database on the PCC website and supporting a monthly, local event called ‘Climate Science on Tap’. 

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Ann Bostrom elected to Board of Directors for the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Ann Bostrom, Weyerhaeuser Endowed Professor in Environmental Policy, was elected to the board of directors of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The AAAS seeks to "advance science, engineering, and innovation throughout the world for the benefit of all people." Congratulations, Ann!

Learn more about the AAAS 2018 elections

Responding to the National Climate Assessment Report

When paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould heard from his doctor that he had a rare and serious stomach cancer, he went straight to the medical library and devoured the scientific literature on his condition. He tells this story in his essay The Median Isn’t the Message.  “The literature,”  he writes, “couldn’t have been more brutally clear: mesothelioma is incurable, with a median mortality of only eight months after discovery.” The prognosis, the science, and the statistics helped Gould understand the nature of the disease, but after sitting in shock with the information, his realized that the most statistically likely life expectancy wasn’t up to chance alone.   

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PCC members help connect the dots on climate change through an influential and lasting GCeCS capstone

Studying climate change is not always about the science. The science, however, does lay the foundation for adapting to and mitigating climate change. An example of this relationship was shown no better than in a recent presentation given by a few PCC members. Judy Twedt, Michelle Tigchelaar, Miriam CaukinsAlex Lenferna, and Kate Griffith, all members of the climate caucus within the Union of Academic Student Employees at the University of Washington, talked about climate change in a worker-centric environment that sought to move beyond polarization and stereotyping to have honest dialogue. The idea was originally started by Twedt, who proposed developing a short presentation for the climate caucus on climate change and how it will impact residents of Washington state for her Graduate Certificate in Climate Science (GCeCS). After the initial presentation with the climate caucus, other unions requested similar talks for their membership and staff meetings. The talks have since blossomed into a speakers bureau, picking up members from all over the university.

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Abby Swann on Forecast: a podcast about climate science and climate change

Assistant Professor Abby Swann was recently featured on Forecast, a podcast about climate science and climate change. Michael White, Nature's editor for climate science and host of Forecast, talked with Swann about how plants respond to and affect climate change. Understanding the interactions of vegetation with the atmosphere usually involve long, convoluted, and complex stories, however, Swann eloquently describes such interactions in simple ways in this podcast.

Listen at Forecast

Knut Christianson on the need for self-steering drones under Antarctica’s ice shelves

Knut Christianson, an assistant professor of Earth and Space Sciences, was profiled in the Scientific American about his current multi-million dollar project. Christianson, along with the Paul G. Allen Philanthropies foundation, will send a fleet of seven underwater robots into the world on a risky yearlong mission. Their goal is to help forecast sea level rise by observing the melting processes where layers of warm and cool water mix at the shelf. The complex physics in this unique region are poorly understood and make for a highly intriguing study. Scientists have been unable to make robust predictions about the ice shelves’ future and this seeks to change that.

Read More at Scientific American

Experiencing the Antarctic Through Art-PCC grads go on a field trip

by Michael Diamond, Atmospheric Sciences Graduate Student and PCC Graduate Student Representative On Saturday, October 28, a group of graduate students with the Program on Climate Change visited the Winston Wachter Fine Art gallery to see the exhibit “Antarctica” by artist Zaria Forman. The exhibit features detailed drawings of ice from Zaria’s four-week art residency aboard the National Geographic Explorer expedition ship. 

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