News & Blog


27 posts in GCeCS Capstone

Can Communicating the Benefits of Novel Ecosystem Restoration Techniques Promote Climate Change Literacy and Action?

Learning about how restoration projects can benefit their communities can inspire people to take more than just the usual, low-effort actions meant to address climate change. Read about my online workshop held in fulfillment of the UW PCC Graduate Certificate in Climate Science. Written by James Lee I’m from a place in the San Francisco Bay Area where ecosystem restoration is talked about a lot. 

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Lessons Learned: How Can We Connect Middle School Students to Climate Change and Ocean Acidification?

A collaboration between UW students and DNR using local nearshore ecosystems as examples to center a climate change curriculum. A capstone in fulfillment of the UW PCC Graduate Certificate in Climate Science. Written by: Amanda Arnold, Katie Byrnes, and Lizzy Matteri Climate change is so vast and complex, riddled with intricate interactions, making  teaching it to young students daunting. Additionally, while many middle school teachers have training in biology and want to incorporate climate change and biological responses to climate change in their teaching, they often lack formal coursework in climate change. 

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How can sea otters help mitigate climate change impacts?

Kelp, urchins, carbon, indigenous participation, and reintroduction are part of the answer. Read about my event of short engaging lightning talks in fulfillment of the UW PCC Graduate Certificate in Climate Science. Written by: Amy Olsen Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) are a small mammal in the weasel family. They are a keystone species, which means they have a big impact on keeping their ecosystem balanced. 

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It’s better outside: Water and Climate Science Education

written by Oriana Chegwidden  Paper is crummy in the rain. Teenagers are listening, even if they seem distracted. An illustration of a snowman is incomplete without a stovepipe hat.  A few of the lessons learned while exploring outdoor climate change education as part of my Graduate Certificate in Climate Science.  The origin story The saga began in January 2017 when Jessica Badgeley, a graduate student in the Earth and Space Sciences department at the University of Washington, asked me whether I would be interested in being a guest scientist the upcoming summer on a Girls on Ice (GOI) Expedition to Mount Baker in the North Cascades. 

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What can states and their partners do about ocean acidification?

Working with the OA Alliance to map out pathways to action Written by: Charlotte Dohrn and Hanna Miller What do you think of when you read “ocean acidification”? For many of us, the phrase conjures up an image of an oyster. These delicious bivalves have been the “face” of ocean acidification (OA) since the mid-2000s. While scientists had previously been aware of OA, it wasn’t until oyster hatcheries on the U.S. 

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Hi There, Partner: A workshop on communicating and collaborating across differences

Talking to people about what you believe in is always hard, especially when they don’t have the same beliefs as you. It can be even more challenging with the daunting timelines from the IPCC in the background. Scientists can be better equipped to discuss climate change across political and ideological difference with more training on how to frame their argument. Developing relationships with different communities can allow scientists to address their research questions and local concerns in a team effort to address climate change. 

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Making a Real Connection: Using a Computer Game to Communicate about Climate Change and National Parks 

Do you like playing games? I’m talking about board games, cooperative team challenges, outdoor sports… If you’re a fan of getting your game on, you are not alone! Engaging in creative play provides captivating experiences that appeal to many people in ways that other types of experiences simply can’t match. Not only do games entertain, but they can also provide effective tools for learning, particularly about topics that are difficult to communicate about. 

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Closing the Gap Between Science and Use: New Interactive Data Visualizations of Washington’s Sea Level Rise Projections Using Tableau

Want your science to be used by planners or decision makers? Interactive data visualizations are a great way to make your information more accessible and usable. Providing users with easy “soundbites” to take away from your tool helps too. Scaling climate projections to local, policy-relevant scales is difficult. Trying to take these results andpackage them in an accessible way for decision makers can be even more challenging. 

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PCC/GCeCS Information Session

Graduate Certificate in Climate Science (GCeCS) 2019 Capstone and Outreach Opportunities December 2019 Each fall graduate students interested in learning more about the Program on Climate Change (PCC) and the Graduate Certificate in Climate Science (GCeCS) gather to introduce themselves and learn about capstone opportunities. On 7 Nov 2019 twenty-five students heard directly from three mentors, from fellow students working on capstones, from the PCC Director Becky Alexander, and from GCeCS adviser Miriam Bertram. 

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How do you solve a problem like (teaching) climate change? Through problem-based learning!

What if we could offset the harms of global warming by spraying particles in the stratosphere or artificially increasing Arctic sea ice? Even if ideas like these were feasible, what might the unintended consequences be? And if there are “winners” and “losers” for a given proposal, who gets to decide what is to be done? Sammamish High School students were asked to tackle difficult questions like these this autumn as part of my Program on Climate Change (GCeCS) capstone project. 

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