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46 posts in Blog Post

Going the Distance – First ever virtual GCC organized jointly by UW and MIT students explores climate research through climate policy and DEI lenses

The 14th Annual Graduate Climate Conference (GCC) was held virtually for the first time ever over the weekend of October 30 – November 1, 2020, bringing together graduate students across a wide range of disciplines with ‘climate’ as a research theme. This conference is known across the graduate climate community as a “conference for students, by students.”  A team of volunteer graduate students organizes the conference, which is attended exclusively by graduate students at no cost. 

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Preparing for the Future of Our Planet: A Look at UW’s Climate Minor

Written by Jordan Winter Climate change is one of the defining issues of our time. It seems like there are new developments every week—another storm to keep track of, rising levels of greenhouse gases, more species going extinct. With all that is going on in the world, what can I do about it? How can I use my voice and amplify the voices of others? 

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2020 PCC SI: Climate Extremes and Climate and Environmental Equity

PCC held its first virtual Summer Institute (SI) over five days from September 14 – 18, 2020. The topic of this year’s SI was “Climate Extremes and Climate and Environmental Equity”  Written by Becky Alexander, Lead Summer Institute Organizer, PCC Director and Atmospheric Sciences Professor The topic was chosen via in-person (pre-COVID) voting at the annual Winter Welcome on February 25, 2020. 

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Introducing ACORN Projects

We often refer to an “academic bubble” filled with researchers, professors, and students, like ourselves, who are isolated from the broader communities they inhabit. Importantly, academic research objectives don’t always align with the immediate, actionable priorities of these wider communities. While the extent to which “academic bubbles” exist can be debated, there is undoubtedly room for improvement in conducting meaningful engagement and research in partnership with communities. 

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It’s better outside: Water and Climate Science Education

written by Oriana Chegwidden  Paper is crummy in the rain. Teenagers are listening, even if they seem distracted. An illustration of a snowman is incomplete without a stovepipe hat.  A few of the lessons learned while exploring outdoor climate change education as part of my Graduate Certificate in Climate Science.  The origin story The saga began in January 2017 when Jessica Badgeley, a graduate student in the Earth and Space Sciences department at the University of Washington, asked me whether I would be interested in being a guest scientist the upcoming summer on a Girls on Ice (GOI) Expedition to Mount Baker in the North Cascades. 

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What can states and their partners do about ocean acidification?

Working with the OA Alliance to map out pathways to action Written by: Charlotte Dohrn and Hanna Miller What do you think of when you read “ocean acidification”? For many of us, the phrase conjures up an image of an oyster. These delicious bivalves have been the “face” of ocean acidification (OA) since the mid-2000s. While scientists had previously been aware of OA, it wasn’t until oyster hatcheries on the U.S. 

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The Present Writes the Future: Climate Writing in the Era of COVID-19

There is no preparation for how to teach and learn during a global pandemic, much less how to approach writing about the climate crisis amidst an acute public health crisis. During Spring quarter, as we moved our lives online and braced ourselves for the uncertainties and suffering brought on by COVID-19, I met twice a week with a group of undergraduates, leading a class on climate writing. 

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Hi There, Partner: A workshop on communicating and collaborating across differences

Talking to people about what you believe in is always hard, especially when they don’t have the same beliefs as you. It can be even more challenging with the daunting timelines from the IPCC in the background. Scientists can be better equipped to discuss climate change across political and ideological difference with more training on how to frame their argument. Developing relationships with different communities can allow scientists to address their research questions and local concerns in a team effort to address climate change. 

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A Message from the PCC

In these challenging times, PCC recognizes the disproportionate impacts of the pandemic and climate change on black and brown communities and cultures around the world. Disproportionate impacts are fueled by systemic racism exemplified by the recent killing of unarmed African Americans in the United States. While recent protests here in Seattle and around the country make such inequities especially apparent now, we realize that these inequities represent the everyday lives of racial minorities now and have for generations. 

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How can communities reduce their carbon footprint? An introduction to Community Choice Aggregation and community science

Here in Seattle, hydropower supplies more than 85% of our electricity. But in Arlington County, Virginia, the dominant utility derives at least 50% of its energy from fossil fuels. This leaves electricity consumers with little power over their carbon footprints—how can communities reduce their greenhouse gas emissions while tied to a utility-controlled energy mix? Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) offers an alternative to existing utilities, providing renewable energy options at competitive rates. 

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