News & Blog


ICYMI: Union of Concerned Scientists Science (UCS) Advocacy Workshop

by Emma Kahle On April 12th, a lovely spring afternoon, students, faculty, and staff gathered to learn about science advocacy. OCN 425 filled to the brim with folks interested in how to address the topic of climate with audiences skeptical of climate change or of science in general. These “hostile” audiences could include reporters (getting interviewed for your latest climate publication?), legislators (testifying before the House Science Committee?), or members of the public you meet in person or on the Internet. 

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Graduate Student Representative, Greg Quetin, has a new paper in the Journal of Climate

Department of Atmospheric Sciences Graduate Student and PCC Graduate Student Representative, Greg Quetin, recently published a paper in the Journal of Climate on the interaction of vegetation and global climate. The study found that the composition of ecosystems can be shaped by climate in order to take advantage of local environmental conditions. Moreover, the interaction between photosynthesis and temperature can respond to different climatological states. The combination of these two factors determines ecological-climate interaction and the pattern can provide a functional constraint for process-based models, helping to improve predictions of the global-scale response of vegetation to a changing climate.

Read more at the Journal of Climate

Former PCC member Hilary Palevsky discusses the meaning of science activism

Hilary Palevsky, a former member of the Program on Climate Change, talks about the meaning behind the March for Science. Palevsky states that it is important to listen "to the voices of the most marginalized people when we talk about how we stand up for science because in a lot of ways, the organization of the March for Science reproduced a lot of the same issues that have been long standing in the scientific community”.  

Read More at WCAI

David Battisti and Tom Ackerman talk about geoengineering in the NYT

David Battisti and Tom Ackerman of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences were quoted in The New York Times this past week. When talking about the uncertainty of putting aerosols in the atmosphere Battisti said it is “not obvious to me that we can reduce the uncertainty to anywhere near a tolerable level — that is, to the level that there won’t be unintended consequences that are really serious". Ackerman said that “we are doing an experiment now that we don’t understand" when talking about the risk of starting to geoengineer.

Read more at The New York Times

David Bonan, PCC Undergraduate Assistant, interviews Inez Fung

The undergraduate assistant for the PCC, David Bonan, interviewed Dr. Inez Fung during her visit to the University of Washington as the 2017 Distinguished Visiting Atmospheric Scientist Lecturer. They discussed the current state of climate and climate change research, better climate communication, and her relationship with a close colleague of hers that recently passed away, Piers Sellers.  

Read "Making the Esoteric Pertinent: A talk with Inez Fung"

Spring Symposium on April 8-a new event organized by PCC graduate students

The first annual PCC Spring Symposium will be held on Saturday, April 8 from 9:00am-5:30pm in the Fisheries Sciences Building's Auditorium and Lobby. This graduate student-organized event will include a wide range of talks by PCC graduate students and postdocs throughout the day, as well as an afternoon poster session with beer/wine and hors d'oeuvres. This promises to be a great event with 60 people already registered to attend! All are welcome to attend all or part of the day even if they did not have a chance to register! We hope this event will help strengthen the PCC community by providing opportunities for networking, particularly between grad students and postdocs. By keeping the presentations fairly short we hope to provide the opportunity for as many people as possible to share their research with the community. Understanding what others, especially in other departments, are working on with respect to climate is critical for generating the kind of interdisciplinary collaborations central to the PCC. It also gives you a chance to learn to whom you should be directing your ocean circulation/carbon budget/vector-borne disease/etc. questions! For questions, contact symposium organizer Paige Logan, pdlogan@uw.edu. All are welcome.

Check out the day's schedule!

Climate change is not in the future but is here and now

“The present consequences of climate change are severe, and will be more so for the next generation.” Read the op-ed by Paul Johnson to the Seattle Times published March 31, 2017. Paul Johnson in a professor of oceanography here at UW who has been co-teaching an undergraduate course titled “Climate Extremes” for over 20 years. 

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GCeCS and Capstone Meeting: April 4 at 2:30

The Graduate Certificate in Climate Science (GCeCS) combines coursework and a capstone experience, and one important step is identifying a capstone project. To help students frame a project, and to connect with mentors/project partners, we are holding an informal gathering on April 4 from 2:30-3:30 in OCN 310. We will divide into small groups, and those interested in education will have the opportunity to learn more about our annual workshop with high school teachers. 

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