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52 posts in People

David Battisti and Tom Ackerman talk about geoengineering in the NYT

David Battisti and Tom Ackerman of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences were quoted in The New York Times this past week. When talking about the uncertainty of putting aerosols in the atmosphere Battisti said it is “not obvious to me that we can reduce the uncertainty to anywhere near a tolerable level — that is, to the level that there won’t be unintended consequences that are really serious". Ackerman said that “we are doing an experiment now that we don’t understand" when talking about the risk of starting to geoengineer.

Read more at The New York Times

David Bonan, PCC Undergraduate Assistant, interviews Inez Fung

The undergraduate assistant for the PCC, David Bonan, interviewed Dr. Inez Fung during her visit to the University of Washington as the 2017 Distinguished Visiting Atmospheric Scientist Lecturer. They discussed the current state of climate and climate change research, better climate communication, and her relationship with a close colleague of hers that recently passed away, Piers Sellers.  

Read "Making the Esoteric Pertinent: A talk with Inez Fung"

UW Atmos and ESS collaboration—Arctic sea ice loss and natural variability

David Battisti, Edward Blanchard-Wrigglesworth, Stephen Po-Chedley, and Ryan Eastman of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences and Eric Steig of the Department of Earth and Space Sciences recently published a paper in Nature about the influence of high-latitude atmospheric circulation changes on summertime Arctic sea ice. The study found that a substantial amount of summer sea ice loss in recent decades was due to natural variability in the atmosphere over the Arctic Ocean.

Read More in Nature

Many students of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences were recognized

Congratulations to PCC graduate student Marysa Lague, who was selected as one of the Husky 100 this year! A couple of PCC graduate students earned student prizes at the recent 2017 American Meteorological Society Annual meeting: (1) Michael Diamond received an honorable mention among entries in the 9aerosol section for his oral presentation on “Entrainment and Mixing of Biomass Burning Aerosol into the Namibian Stratocumulus Cloud Deck”; (2) Karl Lapo won for his oral presentation on “Testing Turbulence Schemes in Land Models During Stable Conditions”; and (3) Stephanie Rushley won among entries in the 5mjo category for her oral presentation on “Examining Changes to the Madden-Julian Oscillation in a Warmer Climate using CMIP5 Models”. 

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Kristin Laidre awarded 2017 Pew Marine Fellowship

Kristin Laidre was awarded the 2017 Pew Marine Fellowship to study the effects of climate change on polar bears. Laidre's project entails working with researchers and agencies in four Arctic nations to compare data across all studied polar bear populations and compile the most comprehensive assessment to date of population status. Laidre plans to examine the potential this metric has for assessing population status.

Read more at UW Today

UW Glaciologists uncover truths about hidden lakes on West Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier

UW Glaciologists, Alexander Huth and Ian Joughin,and Noel Gourmele of the University of Edinburgh used data from the European Space Agency’s CryoSat-2 to study a sudden drainage of large pools below Thwaites Glacier. Thwaites Glacier is one of two fast-moving glaciers at the edge of the West Antarctic ice sheet. The recently published study in The Cryosphere shows four interconnected lakes that drained in eight months. The glacier sped up by about 10 percent during that time, showing that the glacier’s long-term movement is fairly oblivious to trickles at its underside.

Read more at The Cryosphere

Dargan Frierson and Judy Twedt create "The Sound of Earth's Fever"

With NASA releasing the 2016 global temperature data, Dargan Frierson and Judy Twedt made quick work of the high temperatures. Using the global temperature data from 1880-2016, they created a song about the Earth's global temperature. Lower notes mean lower temperature, and higher notes are higher temperature. They chose notes from a musical scale and added drums just for effect. Dargan and Judy state that they "pause in 1977, a critical year for climate" because "scientists were confident at this point that heat-trapping gases from fossil fuels were the main way humans were influencing the climate".

Listen on Soundcloud
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