News & Blog


21 posts in News and Views

Things I learned from leading the PCC

The 2017 Program on Climate Change Summer Institute on “Population Health and Climate Change” that took place at the beautiful UW Friday Harbor Laboratory last week gave me the opportunity to reflect on my tenure as Director of the Program on Climate Change that started in fall 2011. In fall of 2010 at the beginning of my last sabbatical, I joined an effort to build collaborations between the newly formed College of the Environment and the also young Department of Global Health to focus on global environmental change and human health. 

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Distorted news and scientific studies

Abby Swann, an assistant professor of atmospheric sciences and biology at the University of Washington, recently talked to Earth & Space Science News (EOS) about the rise in disinformation of scientific results. A study she conducted in 2016 about modeling found that forest loss in the southwestern United States and the Amazon could actually cause trees to grow faster in the southeastern United States and eastern South America. Ready to combat articles that were going to skew the results, Swann armed herself with talking points on non-climate-related benefits of trees. As of right now, only one right-wing newspaper in Australia has written a misleading article about her work.

Read More at EOS

Greg Johnson, of NOAA's PMEL, will lead massive Deep ARGO project

Greg Johnson, an oceanographer at NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle received a $4 million grant from Paul G. Allen Philanthropies to deploy the first large-scale array of the new sensors, called Deep Argo floats. Johnson states that “understanding ocean temperatures is vital to understanding climate and climate change. Since 1970, the oceans have absorbed more than 90 percent of the excess heat from greenhouse warming”. 

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Becoming a Scientist 4.0

By Michelle Tigchelaar & Johanna Goldman As the District of Columbia was preparing itself to watch the James Comey hearing the way soccer fans watch World Cup matches — in a bar at 10am — we were huddled together in a building just blocks away from the center of action, preparing ourselves instead for Day 4 of the AMS Summer Policy Colloquium.   

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PCC-IGERT students write New York Times article to advise state policy makers

By Katherine Crosman (Evans School of Public Policy and Governance), Leah Johnson (Applied Physics Laboratory & School of Oceanography), Eleni Petrou (School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences), and Hillary Scannell (School of Oceanography) Feverish conditions in the Pacific Ocean in recent years sparked a global conversation on the impacts of a changing climate on coastal ecosystems and communities. In response, The New York Times (NYT) published an article, which became the focus of a Pacific-wide competition. 

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Former PCC graduate student of ESS says goodbye to glaciers

Twila Moon, a PCC Fellow and former Department of Earth and Space Sciences graduate student recently wrote an article in Science talking about the the global retreat of glaciers. Moon states that "photographs and aerial and satellite images of glaciers show consistent, substantial, and anomalous retreat from the Antarctic Peninsula through Patagonia, Kilimanjaro, and the Himalayas to Greenland and the Arctic. Iconic glaciers—such as many in Glacier National Park, Montana—have already disappeared".

Read more at Science

Former PCC member Hilary Palevsky discusses the meaning of science activism

Hilary Palevsky, a former member of the Program on Climate Change, talks about the meaning behind the March for Science. Palevsky states that it is important to listen "to the voices of the most marginalized people when we talk about how we stand up for science because in a lot of ways, the organization of the March for Science reproduced a lot of the same issues that have been long standing in the scientific community”.  

Read More at WCAI

David Battisti and Tom Ackerman talk about geoengineering in the NYT

David Battisti and Tom Ackerman of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences were quoted in The New York Times this past week. When talking about the uncertainty of putting aerosols in the atmosphere Battisti said it is “not obvious to me that we can reduce the uncertainty to anywhere near a tolerable level — that is, to the level that there won’t be unintended consequences that are really serious". Ackerman said that “we are doing an experiment now that we don’t understand" when talking about the risk of starting to geoengineer.

Read more at The New York Times
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