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49 posts in In the News

Graduate Student Representative, Greg Quetin, has a new paper in the Journal of Climate

Department of Atmospheric Sciences Graduate Student and PCC Graduate Student Representative, Greg Quetin, recently published a paper in the Journal of Climate on the interaction of vegetation and global climate. The study found that the composition of ecosystems can be shaped by climate in order to take advantage of local environmental conditions. Moreover, the interaction between photosynthesis and temperature can respond to different climatological states. The combination of these two factors determines ecological-climate interaction and the pattern can provide a functional constraint for process-based models, helping to improve predictions of the global-scale response of vegetation to a changing climate.

Read more at the Journal of Climate

Former PCC member Hilary Palevsky discusses the meaning of science activism

Hilary Palevsky, a former member of the Program on Climate Change, talks about the meaning behind the March for Science. Palevsky states that it is important to listen "to the voices of the most marginalized people when we talk about how we stand up for science because in a lot of ways, the organization of the March for Science reproduced a lot of the same issues that have been long standing in the scientific community”.  

Read More at WCAI

David Battisti and Tom Ackerman talk about geoengineering in the NYT

David Battisti and Tom Ackerman of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences were quoted in The New York Times this past week. When talking about the uncertainty of putting aerosols in the atmosphere Battisti said it is “not obvious to me that we can reduce the uncertainty to anywhere near a tolerable level — that is, to the level that there won’t be unintended consequences that are really serious". Ackerman said that “we are doing an experiment now that we don’t understand" when talking about the risk of starting to geoengineer.

Read more at The New York Times

Climate change is not in the future but is here and now

“The present consequences of climate change are severe, and will be more so for the next generation.” Read the op-ed by Paul Johnson to the Seattle Times published March 31, 2017. Paul Johnson in a professor of oceanography here at UW who has been co-teaching an undergraduate course titled “Climate Extremes” for over 20 years. 

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UW Atmos and ESS collaboration—Arctic sea ice loss and natural variability

David Battisti, Edward Blanchard-Wrigglesworth, Stephen Po-Chedley, and Ryan Eastman of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences and Eric Steig of the Department of Earth and Space Sciences recently published a paper in Nature about the influence of high-latitude atmospheric circulation changes on summertime Arctic sea ice. The study found that a substantial amount of summer sea ice loss in recent decades was due to natural variability in the atmosphere over the Arctic Ocean.

Read More in Nature

Many students of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences were recognized

Congratulations to PCC graduate student Marysa Lague, who was selected as one of the Husky 100 this year! A couple of PCC graduate students earned student prizes at the recent 2017 American Meteorological Society Annual meeting: (1) Michael Diamond received an honorable mention among entries in the 9aerosol section for his oral presentation on “Entrainment and Mixing of Biomass Burning Aerosol into the Namibian Stratocumulus Cloud Deck”; (2) Karl Lapo won for his oral presentation on “Testing Turbulence Schemes in Land Models During Stable Conditions”; and (3) Stephanie Rushley won among entries in the 5mjo category for her oral presentation on “Examining Changes to the Madden-Julian Oscillation in a Warmer Climate using CMIP5 Models”. 

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