News & Blog


49 posts in In the News

Greg Johnson, of NOAA’s PMEL, will lead massive Deep ARGO project

Greg Johnson, an oceanographer at NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle received a $4 million grant from Paul G. Allen Philanthropies to deploy the first large-scale array of the new sensors, called Deep Argo floats. Johnson states that “understanding ocean temperatures is vital to understanding climate and climate change. Since 1970, the oceans have absorbed more than 90 percent of the excess heat from greenhouse warming”. 

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Becoming a Scientist 4.0

By Michelle Tigchelaar & Johanna Goldman As the District of Columbia was preparing itself to watch the James Comey hearing the way soccer fans watch World Cup matches — in a bar at 10am — we were huddled together in a building just blocks away from the center of action, preparing ourselves instead for Day 4 of the AMS Summer Policy Colloquium.   

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PCC-IGERT students write New York Times article to advise state policy makers

By Katherine Crosman (Evans School of Public Policy and Governance), Leah Johnson (Applied Physics Laboratory & School of Oceanography), Eleni Petrou (School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences), and Hillary Scannell (School of Oceanography) Feverish conditions in the Pacific Ocean in recent years sparked a global conversation on the impacts of a changing climate on coastal ecosystems and communities. In response, The New York Times (NYT) published an article, which became the focus of a Pacific-wide competition. 

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Earth likely to warm more than 2 degrees this century says Dr. Frierson

A recent paper published in Nature Climate Change by a group of UW researchers, including Dr. Dargan Frierson, explains just how critical climate action is. The authors use a fully statistical approach based on country-specific variables to forecast CO2 emissions and temperature change to the year 2100. The study is based on the already implemented emission mitigation policies seen today and finds that it is unlikely that the increase in global temperature will stay under the 2°C mark, and that a change between 2°C and 4.9°C globally is more likely.

Read More at UW News

Teachings kids about climate change where most parents are skeptics

A partner with the PCC and the UW in the High Schools Program, Jamie Esler, was recently featured in The Washington Post. Jamie was a part of the PCC Education's Climate Science for the Classroom and has been allowing students to understand the meaning of climate change on their own terms. The course allows students to actively investigate the most current scientific research behind the nature of Earth's global climate system, and the factors influencing this system. His actions represents a greater struggle to teach climate change in high schools.

Read more at The Washington Post

Climate Science on Tap!

The Climate Science on Tap panel discussed sea level rise, its causes and impacts around Puget Sound, and what is being done to prepare and respond in the future. LuAnne Thompson, Director of the UW Program on the Climate Change, was a part of the panel discussing last week.

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Refuting EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's claim

Qiang Fu (UW Department of Atmospheric Sciences), and Stephen Po-Chedley (recent grad of UW Atmos), are coauthors on the recently published paper refuting EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's claim that, "over the past two decades satellite data indicates there has been a leveling off of warming". The group instead goes back to 1979 and uses satellite data to illustrate the warming over the past 40 years.

Read more at The Washington Post

Eric Steig is in The New York Times

The New York Times has been doing a series on Antarctica and the signals of climate change over the past few weeks. In Part 3 of their series, they talk about the culprit for the loss of ice around West Antarctica. Some point to the strengthening of the winds, churning up more warm ocean water. however, Eric Steig, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, mentions that "we’re not sure because we don’t have enough data, for long enough, to separate signal from noise".

Read more at The New York Times
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