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Abby Swann seeks to explain the importance of land-atmosphere interactions through a brand-new course

A brand-new course called “ATM S 493: Ecological Climatology” is being offered this Autumn quarter. Abby Swann, an assistant professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences and Department of Biology will be teaching the course. Her research focuses in on global scale interactions between terrestrial ecosystems and atmospheric circulation. Not surprisingly, the course will investigate the connection between ecosystems and climate including physical, chemical, and biological interactions. 

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Greg Johnson, of NOAA's PMEL, will lead massive Deep ARGO project

Greg Johnson, an oceanographer at NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle received a $4 million grant from Paul G. Allen Philanthropies to deploy the first large-scale array of the new sensors, called Deep Argo floats. Johnson states that “understanding ocean temperatures is vital to understanding climate and climate change. Since 1970, the oceans have absorbed more than 90 percent of the excess heat from greenhouse warming”. 

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Earth likely to warm more than 2 degrees this century says Dr. Frierson

A recent paper published in Nature Climate Change by a group of UW researchers, including Dr. Dargan Frierson, explains just how critical climate action is. The authors use a fully statistical approach based on country-specific variables to forecast CO2 emissions and temperature change to the year 2100. The study is based on the already implemented emission mitigation policies seen today and finds that it is unlikely that the increase in global temperature will stay under the 2°C mark, and that a change between 2°C and 4.9°C globally is more likely.

Read More at UW News

Teachings kids about climate change where most parents are skeptics

A partner with the PCC and the UW in the High Schools Program, Jamie Esler, was recently featured in The Washington Post. Jamie was a part of the PCC Education's Climate Science for the Classroom and has been allowing students to understand the meaning of climate change on their own terms. The course allows students to actively investigate the most current scientific research behind the nature of Earth's global climate system, and the factors influencing this system. His actions represents a greater struggle to teach climate change in high schools.

Read more at The Washington Post

Climate Science on Tap!

The Climate Science on Tap panel discussed sea level rise, its causes and impacts around Puget Sound, and what is being done to prepare and respond in the future. LuAnne Thompson, Director of the UW Program on the Climate Change, was a part of the panel discussing last week.

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PCC Funding for mini symposia is available

The PCC is pleased to welcome proposals for mini symposia held at University of Washington or nearby for the PCC community and visitors. Symposia should be planned to occur before the end of 2018 on topics grounded in climate science broadly considered and must clearly meet the mission of the PCC. The PCC can provide financial support up to $5,000 to pay for a venue, food and travel for a few visitors for up to 2 symposia. 

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Applications for PCC Interdisciplinary Fellowships are available

A new graduate fellowship opportunity to begin between winter 2018 and winter 2019 is being offered to support one or more students with a clear passion for working across academic boundaries on projects grounded in climate science. The application includes a written proposal for research that is not currently defined as the students’ dissertation research, and that has the support of faculty/staff in two different units (academic departments, research units, etc.). The goal of this opportunity is to build collaboration across disciplines while addressing a proposed climate related research, communication, data driven etc. goal. We have a total of 9 months (3 quarters) of support for this opportunity, and proposals asking for 3, 6 or 9 months of support will be considered. We will also entertain proposals for joint projects that include two graduate students that are matriculated in different departments. These funds will only be awarded if the applicant(s) and the proposed project(s) and collaborations clearly meet the goals and criteria described in the announcement. The application period will end October 15, 2017 and awards to be made by December 2017. This fellowship opportunity will be made available again in 2018.

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Refuting EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's claim

Qiang Fu (UW Department of Atmospheric Sciences), and Stephen Po-Chedley (recent grad of UW Atmos), are coauthors on the recently published paper refuting EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's claim that, "over the past two decades satellite data indicates there has been a leveling off of warming". The group instead goes back to 1979 and uses satellite data to illustrate the warming over the past 40 years.

Read more at The Washington Post
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